Make good tables

“The Church’s approach to an intelligent carpenter is usually confined to exhorting him not to be drunk and disorderly in his leisure hours, and to come to church on Sundays. What the Church should be telling him is this: that the very first demand that his religion makes upon him is that he should make…

Faith enough for the both of us

Yesterday I held the hand of a dying man. I spoke words of peace and offered him his last communion. He had faith enough for the both of us. This once gregarious soul could barely communicate, but as I placed the bread on his tongue and poured some little bit of juice past his lips….

Pointing toward perfection

If you’re looking to read a few excellent thoughts about perfection this month I’d like to point you here.

A woodworking school

I’m pleased to announce a woodworking school will be opening in Ayden, NC at some point during the next few months. Given my post earlier in the week you may be tempted to think this is my doing, but… well… a funny thing happened on the way to look at that property again. I met Stuart…

It’s friggin’ for sale

I have a habit of setting my sights too low. If you’ve followed me on Instagram for any period of time you’ve probably sussed out my latent desire to buy an old building and start a woodworking school and co-op. It was something of a pipe dream until a few months ago when this building…

Two years and switching gears

I find it hard to believe that this week marks two years since I first posted on The Daily Skep. I also find it hard to believe how much things have changed. Looking back on those first posts I sometimes wonder how I got from there to here. They were absolutely saturated with romanticism and…

More than enough

I recently ordered a set of Corradi rasps for review. As I was putting them through their paces I decided not to review the full set because there was a fair amount of redundancy between the three coarser rasps. I’ve decided to keep one of the coarse rasps and sell the other two. These are…

Theologians don’t know nothing about my soul.

The ancient Greeks used the word ἁμαρτία (hamartia) to describe those moments when we are less than perfect – those times when we fail. It has moral overtones to be sure, but literally, it means “to miss the mark.” It is an archery term. Its use suggests that when we err, we somehow miss the target…