the hybrid

This is part III of a story that begins here and continues here.

The miter/tenon saw restoration/transformation that has been going on in my shop has been an evolving experiment to some degree. The idea was always to cut the saw down and re-engineer it as a tenon saw. That work has come in stages.

The first stage was to see what it was like to basically keep the saw as-is, but chop it down. The problem I ran into was that the saw plate was really thick. So thick, in fact that it produced significant resistance in the kerf and depending on the wood (I’m looking at you pine) would bind up.

I tried tapering the blade on my belt sander. Not a great idea to be honest. I tried wax to no avail. I tried filing and increasing the set, eh…

It looked pretty good, but at the end of the day the way a saw works is more important than how it looks, and I wasn’t happy with how it was working. The balance of the saw still left something to be desired as well.

If I have one great flaw (among all the other flaws) it would be this: Good enough is not good enough and I can’t leave a thing alone until it’s right.

Enter the D-23 that donated part of its saw plate to the project I posted yesterday. Spoiler alert, it donated the rest of itself to this saw.

The kink in the D-23 was right at a good spot that I could basically remove it by making these two saw plates, and after some cutting and grinding I had a replacement for the thick plate on the tenon saw, with fancy engraving none the less.

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And so, I introduce the D-27 or the no. 19 depending on how you do the math.

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This is a fine saw. It’s filed crosscut at about 12-13 ppi which makes it a fantastic saw for bench work. It needs to be pointed up a bit, but it already proved itself in cutting out the rough stock for the dovetail saw I’m building.

I’m calling this a win.
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2 Comments Add yours

  1. momist says:

    That will confuse future tool archaeologists! Beautifully done.

    Like

    1. Ha, I know! I thought of that as I was doing it, but this saw is a great worker now, so the mystery will endure. 😊

      Like

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